LEED and the Contractor

(Last Updated On: February 3, 2016)

 By Carletta Waddler

I decided this month that I would get a little more targeted with my article.  This article is for the businesses that are interested in building green or being part of the green building process.  Unless you’ve been under a rock and I know you haven’t someone has mentioned LEED certification and LEED accreditation.  The acronym stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.  It is an internationally recognized green building certification system that provides the client with third-party verification that a building, community or school was designed and built using concepts that improve performance in energy and water usage, site selection, community connectivity and stewardship of resources.

LEED was conceived in 1998 to more accurately represent and incorporate emerging green building technologies into a universally recognized rating system.  The mantel for developing requirements for a green rating system was taken up by the USGBC.  The hallmark of LEED is that it is a transparent process where the technical criteria proposed by the USBGC are publically reviewed.   Today LEED consists of a suite of nine rating systems for the design, construction and operation of buildings, schools, homes and neighborhoods.  In fact the LEED rating system is being constantly evaluated and changed by the USGBC.

I trust by now you see the importance of becoming LEED accredited. Just a note… Individuals become LEED accredited and buildings become certified.  To become accredited you must take a training class and pass an exam.  The class is normally two days and requires approximately 60-80 hours of independent study. It’s not easy but it is certainly a valuable tool for your business.

The first step is to become a LEED Green Associate. After LEED-GA you can then become a LEED AP and the list goes on.

Carletta Waddler, president and founder of Sustainable Training Services, LLC and EcoMaintenance, LLC, is a columnist for Green Matters, a regularly featured column of EMPOWER Magazine devoted to informing the community of cutting-edge green initiatives in the lives of individuals and businesses. She aims to enlighten, encourage and, hopefully inspire readers to take steps to make “green” transformations in their lives.

LEED and the Contractor